Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Weekly Update from CCM

Praised be our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!  Today is the memorial of St. Jerome, a priest and doctor of the Church.  The title "doctor of the Church" is granted to those who have made an especially noteworthy contribution to the theological understanding of the Catholic Church.  In St. Jerome's case it is a title well deserved, for he spent 30 years of his life translating the holy scriptures into Latin from their original languages, making them more accessible to Christians in the west.  He also wrote many commentaries on the books of scripture.  A scholar such as St. Jerome would make a good patron for any college student, so why not ask for his intercession the next time you are having a hard time hitting the books?

Here is this week's schedule at Catholic Campus Ministry.

TUESDAY - TODAY
Eucharistic Adoration from noon till 12:30.  Come for half an hour of silent prayer in our chapel.

Small Group scripture study & discussion from 6:30 to 7:30pm in the Balsam Lobby area.  


WEDNESDAY - TOMORROW
Vespers at 6:00pm in our chapel.  Evening Prayer service from the Liturgy of the Hours.

Supper @ the Center.  Free home-cooked meal starting at 6:30pm.  Our after-dinner program this week will be led by Bekka Mayen, and will be on "Taming Your Tongue."  I know we all need to work on that from time to time, so this should be an interesting discussion.  We hope to see you there.


THURSDAY
Eucharistic Adoration from noon till 12:30 in the chapel.

Small Group scripture study & discussion from 5:30 to 6:30pm on the UC Balcony.  (Meet inside the 2nd floor if raining).


SATURDAY
CCM Homework Support Group at 4:00pm.  Several students have decided to encourage one another to complete their homework on Saturday so that they can better keep Sunday as a day of rest.  To help achieve that, they are gathering on Saturday afternoons at CCM for a homework & study party.  Everyone is invited.  The group may also have dinner together or watch a movie after the work is done.


SUNDAY
Life Chain from 2:30-3:30pm in downtown Sylva.  Meet at the Courthouse to join others from area churches (including many from St. Mary's) in this one-hour silent witness for the dignity of all human life.

Rosary at 3:30pm in the chapel.  Note, Father Voitus will not be available for confessions before Mass this week due to participation in the Life Chain. He will be available for confessions immediately after Mass for any who need it.  

Mass at 4:00pm.  27th Sunday of Ordinary Time.  Click here for the Mass readings.

Credo from 5:15 to 6:30pm.  This week's topic for discussion will be the Holy Spirit.  In many ways the Spirit is the most mysterious Person of the Holy Trinity, yet He is the one we have the most direct experience with in the Church today.  Come learn about the Advocate and Paraclete who Christ promised to send us.  Bring your questions!


NEXT MONDAY
Simply Stitched meets at Alex Cassell's house at 8:00pm.  Meet at CCM at 7:45pm if you need a ride.


NEXT TUESDAY
Community Table volunteer day.  We will be helping to cook and serve meals for those in need in our community at The Community Table in Sylva.  For those who would like to help, you'll need to be at CCM between 3:00 and 3:15pm (we will be leaving promptly at 3:15).  Wear close toed shoes, and if you have long hair you'll need to have something to tie it back with.  No tank tops.  We will be returning to campus before 6:30pm.  We have a sign up sheet for this and following weeks on the bulletin board downstairs at CCM (by the chapel entrance).  Please sign up so we have an idea of who is coming.  We need 4 or 5 volunteers each week!   "For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me" (Mt 25:35).


TIME IS ALMOST UP!
This is the last week to order one of our "Former Fetus" pro-life t-shirts!  This is a CCM fundraiser, so not only will you be showing solidarity with the unborn, you will also be helping our ministry.  Order yours today before they disappear!


FALL BEACH RETREAT
Spots are still open for our annual Fall Beach Retreat Oct. 24-26.  Registration is $50 each.  Come get a nice weekend away from campus, spending time with your CCM family, and drawing closer to God.  Our retreats feature talks & discussions, prayers, lots of relaxing quiet time, and fun time to play on the beach, as well.  Space is limited, so sign up soon.  (Sign up sheet is on the fridge).  Sponsorships are available for anyone who needs them - see me in person.  


FAITH FACTS
Yesterday the Church celebrated the feast of the Archangels, Michael, Gabriel and Raphael.  In a couple of days, on Oct. 2, we will celebrate the memorial of the guardian angels.  What does the Church teach about angels, and what do we know about the three archangels in particular?  Here is a helpful article from Catholic Online written for the Feast of the Archangels.

Till next week....  God Bless!
Pax Christi,
Matt

--
WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Gospel For Today: 26th Sunday of Ordinary Time

TWENTY-SIXTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME (A)

When I was learning about the Catholic faith in college, it seemed to me that Catholicism is more of a both/and religion than an either/or religion.  By that I am not meaning moral choices.  When it comes to good and evil, the Catholic Church gives us very clear instruction.  One must never choose evil, even if one intends good to come from it.  In that respect, the Catholic faith is very much either/or.  Likewise when it comes to our basic faith in Christ.  One either believes Christ is God, or He is not.  There is no middle ground.  So in that respect we are also an either/or faith.

But there are many important aspects of our faith which are definitely both/and.  Jesus is fully human and fully divine.  God is perfectly just and perfectly merciful.  We believe in Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition.  We believe that faith and works are necessary for our salvation. These complementary truths work in tandem with one another to make a comprehensible and sensible whole.  Most heresies arise when someone emphasizes one truth in isolation of another.   They take something that should be both/and and treat it like an either/or.

Martin Luther understood God's justice but had a hard time accepting God's mercy and so never felt truly forgiven.  He doubted the possibility of his own salvation until he read in Romans that "man is justified by faith apart from works of the law" (Rm 3:28).  The German friar latched on to that truth (that faith is necessary for salvation) to the exclusion of another (that good works are needed, too).

When St. Paul mentions "works of the law" in Romans he is speaking of the many and varied ritual laws imposed on the Jewish people in Deuteronomy.  He is saying that merely observing these rituals is not enough to save you.  Faith is the important thing.  But he is not saying that you will not also be judged according to your good works (or lack thereof).  Faith must be put into action. Otherwise it is like a gift that remains unopened.  You may possess it, but it is not of any use to you.

It is not enough to believe in Jesus as your savior and not do anything about it.  Jesus Himself says, "If you love me, you will obey my commands" (Jn 14:15).  In Matthew chapter 25 Jesus describes how we will all be judged according to the love and mercy we showed others; whether we visited the sick and imprisoned, clothed the naked or fed the hungry. "Whatever you did for the least of my brethren, you did for me" (Mt 25:40). 

In other words, what we do matters.  Good works in conjunction with a strong faith are both needed if we are to be true followers of Christ.  Both are needed for us to have any hope of heaven.  "Whoever does the will of my Father is my brother, sister and mother," says Jesus (Mt 12:50).  Catholicism is not a spectator sport.  You have to get in the game.

Jesus demonstrates this perfectly with His parable in today's gospel (Mt 21:28-32).  A man asks his two sons to go work in his vineyard.  One says, "Sure, dad," and then goes home and lazes around.  The other says "No way," but then decides to help out his old man. He goes to work in the field.  Which one actually did as his father asked?  The one who first said no, but repented.

There are two important lessons to be learned from this parable.  Firstly, what you say is meaningless unless it is backed up with action.  It is like saying, "Yes," to Jesus then not obeying any of His teachings.  It is a false faith and worth nothing.  Our actions speak louder than our words.

The second lesson is this: repentance is possible.  You may have initially said no to God.  You may be saying no to Him in your life right now.  But you can change your mind.  You can get up and start to work in the vineyard. You can choose today to put your faith into action.  You can choose today to do the will of your heavenly Father.  

But if he turns from the wickedness he has committed,
he does what is right and just,
he shall preserve his life;
since he has turned away from all the sins that he has committed,
he shall surely live, he shall not die.
 (Ez 18:26-28).
--
WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Weekly Update from CCM

Photo from our Fall Beach Retreat 2013.
Good morning, students!  Praise to our Lord Jesus Christ!  I hope you are having a wonderful fall day in the mountains.  I had a great time accompanying some of you down to Charlotte for the 10th annual Eucharistic Congress.  It was good to be together with so many others from across the diocese, including nearly a hundred other college students and young adults who came out for our program on Friday night.

Here is this week's schedule.  

TUESDAY - TODAY
Adoration 12:00-12:30 in our chapel.  We hope you can take advantage of this opportunity to boost your prayer life and get some quality time with Jesus.

Small Group 6:30-7:30pm in Balsam Lobby.  Small group scripture studies are a great way to connect with other Catholic students as well as meet our Lord in the scriptures.  


WEDNESDAY - TOMORROW
Vespers 6:00pm in our chapel.  A short evening prayer service from the Liturgy of the Hours.  Pray like a monk!

Supper @ the Center 6:30-8:30pm.  Brian and Danny are cooking chicken alfredo for us this week.  After dinner, Joseph is leading our program.  This week, the topic is "WiFi: Strengthening Your Connection," and it's all about getting the most out of your prayer life.  We hope to see you there!


THURSDAY
Small Group 5:30-6:30pm on the UC Balcony (meet inside if bad weather).  Remember our small group scripture studies are open to everyone, so bring a friend!

NOTE:  I will be away from campus presenting a workshop at St. John's in Waynesville, so no Adoration on Thursday this week.


SUNDAY
Confession/Rosary 3:30pm.  Father Voitus is available to hear confessions a half hour before Mass.  We also prepare for Mass by praying the rosary together.  We hope you join us!

Mass 4:00pm.  26th Sunday in Ordinary Time. Click here for the readings.

Credo 5:15-6:30pm.  This week's topic is "Jesus Christ."  Almost all of the early heresies in the Church had to do with the person and nature of Jesus Christ.  Without a doubt, He is the most central figure of our faith.  Who is He and what does the Church teach about Him?  Come with questions!


NEXT MONDAY
Simply Stitched 8:00pm at Alex Cassell's house.  Meet at CCM at 7:45 if you need a ride.  Did you know Simply Stitched also has a Facebook page?


"FORMER FETUS" PRO-LIFE T-SHIRT
Only two weeks left of our t-shirt fundraiser.  These shirts proudly state your solidarity with the unborn.  After all, we were all fetuses once!  Support your brothers and sisters in the womb, and CCM at the same time.  Click here to order yours, but do it before Oct. 6. (Shirts are $20 each and come in four different colors).


COMMUNITY TABLE SERVICE DAY
We are signed up to work at Community Table on Tuesday, Oct. 7, from 3:30-6:30pm.  Community Table is a wonderful local food charity that provide meals to those in need in a restaurant style setting.  They not only nourish the body but also respect the dignity of those they serve.  We are excited about being a part of this ministry!  They only need 4 to 6 students to work, so if there is enough interest we are hoping to be able to volunteer on a regular basis. I will have a sign-up sheet on the bulletin board downstairs so we will know who is coming.  We will provide transportation from CCM.


BEACH RETREAT!
It's that time again!  Our annual beach retreat this year is Oct. 24-26.  Cost is $50 (sponsorships available to those who need them - see me).  We can only take 16 students max.  As this is one of our most popular events of the year, I encourage you to sign up soon.  A sign-up sheet is on the fridge at CCM.  (Here's a link to a photo album from last year, to whet your appetite).


FAITH FACTS
Last year at this time there was supposed to have been an Interfaith Conference at WCU at which I was invited to give a 45 minute talk about Catholicism.  Unfortunately that conference was cancelled at the last minute.  But I put the text of my talk online.  It might be helpful for you in explaining just what makes the Catholic faith distinct from all others.  Check it out here.


Until next week!
Pax Christi,
Matt

--
WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Gospel For Today: 25th Sunday of Ordinary Time

TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME (A)

"It's not fair!"  I can't tell you how often as a parent of five children I've heard that phrase shouted in my house.  It seems that all children go through a phase when they seem obsessed with making sure justice is meted out in the household. But is the child's idea of "fairness" really about justice?

This is what we hope it will become.  But our child-like concept of fairness must grow and mature quite a bit to become the virtue of justice.  The Catechism defines justice as "the moral virtue that consists in the constant and firm will to give their due to God and neighbor" (CCC 1807).  This giving people their due can be negative, as in a just punishment for a crime; or it can be positive, as in a just wage for a day's work.

When a child cries, "That's not fair!" however, he or she does not usually mean that someone is not receiving what is due to them.  Usually it means that the child in question is not receiving what they want -- or more often they see another child receiving something good and they don't know how to express their jealousy other than by shouting "It's not fair!"

Today's gospel reading (Mt 20:1-16) offers us an opportunity to examine our own consciences and think about whether we have developed a true sense of justice or are still stuck in the childish view of "fairness."  Today we hear the parable of the laborers in the vineyard.  Some laborers are hired at dawn to work in the master's vineyard and promised a full day's wage.  Other laborers are hired at 9:00am; still more at noon and at three, and so on.  Finally the last laborers are hired at the end of the day and work barely an hour.  When the day's wages are paid out, all receive a full day's pay.

The gospel tells us that the ones who were hired early in the day "grumbled."  That's probably an understatement!  It is not hard to imagine their childish cry upon seeing those who were hired late in the day receiving the full amount of pay -- "That's not fair!"  But the master reminds them that those who worked a full day will also receive a full day's pay, which was exactly what was promised them.  The master in the parable is not being unjust, he is being generous.  Each worker received his due; some received more than their due.  It is the fact that some received more that upsets the first workers.  Their grumbling is not about justice, but jealousy.  

Jesus, in this parable, is warning us against this jealousy.  The master in the story is like God, and we are the workers in the vineyard.  Some of us come to God early in our lives.  Others will come relatively late, after many years of sin.  God is perfectly just, and He will faithfully reward His followers who serve Him all their lives.  But God is also perfectly merciful.  Those who have waited until late in the day to follow Christ need an abundance of mercy, and that is just what God offers them.  This is not injustice.  This is generosity.  This is love.

The lesson to take from today's parable is twofold.  First, those who have served God faithfully for many years should not resent those who come more recently to the faith.  And second, it is never too late to join the workers in the vineyard and come to Christ -- that is to say, it is never too late for repentance and conversion.  Sometimes when we are deep in our sins we may begin to despair and ask, "How can God love me?  It's too late for me to be saved."  But this is the God who would pay those hired at the end of the day a full day's wage.  The hour you come to Him does not matter.  What matters is that you come to Him.

Is that fair?  Probably not according to the childish understanding of "fairness."  If that is fairness, then God is not fair.  And thank God for that!  None of us will get to heaven because it is "fair."  God is more than fair -- He is merciful.  It is only by God's mercy and generous love that we are saved.  


REMINDER!  Father Voitus is available for Confession at 3:30, half an hour before Mass.  But this is not the only time; Confession is also available by appointment, and you can request the sacrament any time you see Father on campus.

--
WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Weekly Update from CCM

Good morning, students!  Praise to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!  I hope you are all having a wonderful start to your week.  Here are this week's schedule and announcements.

TODAY - TUESDAY
Eucharistic Adoration: Noon to 12:30 in our chapel.  Just thirty minutes of quiet time in prayer before the Lord.  If you can't be there the whole time, please come for as long as you can.  There is no "service" per se so you can come and go during this half hour.

Small Group: 6:30-7:30pm in Balsam Lobby.


WEDNESDAY
EMHC Meeting: 5:30pm Anyone interested in serving as an Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion for our Masses on campus please meet with me in the chapel.

Vespers: 6:00pm.  Come early for our dinner and join us in this Evening Prayer service from the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office).

Supper @ the Center 6:30-8:30pm.  This week our chef du jour is Kevin Codd.  Kevin and Pasquale have also put together our program for after dinner, which will be about engaging in "spiritual battle."  What are our spiritual weapons and armor that we need to engage in this essential combat?  Come and learn!


THURSDAY
There will be no Adoration offered this Thursday, as I will be away from campus conducting a workshop at Our Lady of the Mountains in Highlands.  However, our chapel will be open, as always, so please feel free to come pray!

Small Group: 5:30-6:30pm on the UC Balcony (meet inside the balcony if it is raining).


FRIDAY-SATURDAY
Eucharstic Congress.  At least eight students from WCU will be joining about 60 other college students from across the Diocese for the 10th annual Eucharistic Congress in Charlotte this weekend. Please pray for safe travel for all those on the road, and for a successful Congress. If you are going with our group from WCU, please check your email for carpool instructions and other information.


SUNDAY
Confessions/Rosary. 3:30pm.  Fr. Voitus is available before Mass to hear confessions.  Please also join us in praying the rosary at this time.  It is a wonderful way to quiet yourself and prepare to participate prayerfully in the Mass.

Mass. 4:00pm.

Credo. 5:00-6:15pm.  This week our topic for discussion will be "Creation."  What do we mean when we say God created "all that is visible and invisible"?  How does this relate to what science tells us about creation?  And what is our place in creation?  Come with your questions!


NEXT MONDAY
Small Group: 8:00-9:00p in the Village Commons.

Simply Stitched. 8:00-9:00p at Alex Cassell's house (be at CCM at 7:45 if you need a ride).  Remember, even if you don't know how to knit or crochet, you are invited.  Members can teach you!


VOLUNTEER!
We as a campus ministry, would like to support Community Table, a food charity that provides restaurant-style meals to those in need in our community. The times they need help are 3:30 to 6:30 on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. We are attempting to determine which of these days works best for those wanting to help.  If you are interested in volunteering with us, please respond to this Facebook Poll.  (If you are not on Facebook, you can email me your response).


T-SHIRT SALE!  SUPPORT CCM!
Raise your hand if you used to be a fetus! We are trying out a new fundraiser for CCM. We are offering these cool pro-life t-shirts, inspired by an idea from a student, with all proceeds going to support Catholic Campus Ministry. There are two ways you can help.
1) Buy a t-shirt!
2) Help spread the word by posting this link on your social media. The more shirts sell, the larger the donation to CCM!

This shirt will only be available for the next 20 days, so don't delay!  WCU students can receive FREE SHIPPING by opting to pick up their shirt from CCM.


DAILY MASS
St. Mary's has daily Mass at 9:00am each morning.  We have a couple of students from WCU who drive to daily Mass each day and are willing to offer rides to any who wish to go with them.  Contact me for details.


FAITH FACTS
This week has been a pretty intense, one might say "grim," one, least liturgically speaking.  e started on Sunday by celebrating the Triumph of the Cross, where we recalled Jesus' Crucifixion.  Yesterday we celebrated Our Lady of Sorrows, which recognizes that Mary, as Jesus' mother, suffered more than anyone else to see her Son die on the cross.  And today we celebrate two early martyrs, Cyprian and Cornelius, who were only two of many in the early Church who gave their life for Christ.  What does all this tell us about the place that suffering has in our lives and what our Christian response to suffering should be?  Deacon Mike Bickerstaff has an article about sacrifice and suffering which I recommend to you, especially those currently undergoing hardships of any kind.


Until next week,
Matt
--
WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Gospel For Today: Triumph of the Cross

FEAST OF THE EXALTATION OF THE HOLY CROSS

While on the highway this past week I saw a bumper sticker that read, "Harm none, and do as you will."  This is a common moral axiom among Wiccans and other neo-pagans.  It struck me as I drove past the vehicle how similar this was in phrasing to St. Augustine's summation of the Christian moral life: "Love God, and do as you will."  The phrasing may be similar, but the meaning is entirely different.  I noted the contrast between these two on Facebook and was taken to task for picking on Wiccans.  In truth, I was not thinking of Wiccans when I posted because I believe "Harm none, and do as you will" has become the de facto moral code of most people in our society today.  I have heard it espoused by agnostics and atheists, and even some Christians as the only truly universal moral code.

What is wrong with that? you may ask.  Isn't doing no harm a good thing?  With all the violence in the world today, what's wrong with reminding people that harming others is bad?  Nothing is wrong with that.  In fact, it is good.  But it is not good enough.

When it comes to morality today most people assume we should be free to do anything we want as long as it does not negatively impact other people.  That is basically what this axiom tells us.  This seems at first to be very liberating.  I can do whatever I want!  But as a guiding moral principle, it is rather small and limited.  It makes the basis for moral decisions what you shouldn't do but doesn't tell you anything about what you should do.  It is a passive morality, not an active one. Ultimately, that is rather uninspiring.  

Let's contrast this to St. Augustine's, "Love God, and do what you will."  St. Augustine begins with the call to love God.  The heart that loves God perfectly will only desire what is pleasing to God.  Therefore if you truly love God, you can safely do as you will because you will only desire what God wills.  The trick to achieving this is to love God above all things, including yourself.  That's a tall order.

Jesus tells us to "love God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind," and "love your neighbor as yourself" (Mt 22:37-39).  These are the two great commandments in which Christ says are contained all the law and the prophets.  The world today tells us we can do whatever we want as long as it doesn't harm our neighbors.  Christ tell us that's not enough; we must actively love our neighbors.  Of these two, the Christian calling is much more inspiring; it also requires more hard work.  

One moral code is negative: don't do harm.  The other is positive: do love.  One is passive.  The other is active.  One is self-centered.  The other is self-giving.  How is "do no harm" self-centered?  Because it only tells us what we shouldn't do to our neighbors, not what we should do for them, it ultimately becomes all about us and fulfilling our own desires (as long as no one gets hurt in the process).  "Love your neighbor," by contrast, commands us to look beyond ourselves to the needs of those around us.  It calls us to sacrifice our own desires and comfort in order to help others.  And of course if we love our neighbors we will not wish to harm them. The command to love your neighbor actually contains within it the principle of "do no harm," and much more.  This is why I say that "do no harm" is good, but not good enough.  We are called to something greater.

In a different gospel passage (Mk 10:17-22) a man asks Jesus what must he do to gain eternal life.  Jesus reminds him of the Ten Commandments; specifically, "Do not kill, do not commit adultery, do not steal, do not bear false witness, do not defraud."  The man replies that he has observed all of these.  But is it enough?  Is not being a murderer enough?  Is not being an adulterer enough?  Is not being a liar enough? Is not harming others enough?

So you have avoided killing and lying and cheating.  Good for you.  Jesus tells the man, "You lack one thing: go, sell what you have, and give to the poor... and come, follow me."  The gospel reports that the man went away sorrowful.  Why?  The man was fine with not harming his neighbors.  But his love was imperfect.  His love was centered on himself.  He did not love his neighbors enough to sacrifice his own wealth for them.  And he did not love Christ enough to turn away from his old life and follow Him.  

Following Christ means loving like Christ.  Love, by its nature, is self-giving.  God is love, which means God is self-giving.  We see this in the Incarnation, in which "God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him might not perish but might have eternal life" (Jn 3:16).  And we see this most perfectly in the Cross, the ultimate and perfect sacrifice of Jesus Christ, made in love for the very people who nailed Him to the tree.  By His passion and death, Christ "emptied Himself, taking the form of a slave... He humbled Himself, becoming obedient to death, even death on a cross.  Because of this, God greatly exalted Him" (Phil 2:6-11).  

Christ did not come into the world so that He could merely do no harm.  He had a higher calling and so do we who are made in His image.  This is the Triumph of the Cross.  It is a triumph of self-giving.  It is a triumph of sacrifice.  It is a triumph of love.  


-- 
WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Weekly Update from CCM

Dear Students,

Praise to our Lord Jesus Christ!  I hope you are all having a wonderful week.  I look forward to seeing you at some of our CCM activities.  Here is this week's schedule.

TODAY - TUESDAY
Adoration 12:00-12:30.  Come spend 30 minutes of quiet prayer and adoration before our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament.  It's a great way to hit the pause button on your day and remind yourself that God loves you.

Small Group scripture study 6:30pm in Balsam Lobby.


Special note - I will be away from campus Wednesday and Thursday of this week to attend an overnight meeting of diocesan campus ministers.

TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY
Vespers 6:00pm.  Traditional Evening Prayer service from the Liturgy of the Hours.

Supper @ the Center 6:30-8:30pm.  This week it is "Taco Tuesday" even though it's Wednesday!  Come and enjoy the good food and fellowship.  After dinner, we'll relax with one of our favorite games -- Pictionary, Catholic style!  


THURSDAY
There will be no Adoration this Thursday, as I will be out of town.

Small Group scripture study 5:30pm on the UC Balcony (meet inside the 2nd floor if raining).


FRIDAY
Hike to Cullowhee Falls (High Falls).  6:00pm.  Cullowhee Falls is one of our regional treasures.  It's a fairly flat hike, almost 2 miles out, to one of the more spectacular waterfalls in our area.  The trail can get muddy, and the last little bit involves scrambling over some rocks, so please wear appropriate footwear.  We will be leaving from CCM at 6:00, and returning to campus between 8:30 and 9:00, so you will need to bring a flashlight.


SATURDAY
Football Parking Fundraiser.  12:00 - 3:00pm.  We have another home game this Saturday, which means another fundraising opportunity for CCM. If you'd like to help staff our event parking fundraiser, please meet in our parking lot at noon.  We'll be finished before kickoff, so you can still catch the game!


SUNDAY
Rosary & Confession 3:30pm.

Mass 4:00pm.

Credo 5:00 - 6:15pm.  This week's discussion topic continues our journey through the creed with "God the Father."  What does God's revelation of Himself as a Father to us mean for our faith?  What does Fatherhood entail?  Come with your questions!


NEXT MONDAY
Small Group scripture study 6:30pm in the Village Commons.

Simply Stitched 8:00pm.  Knitting and crochet group, meet at Alex Cassell's house or meet at CCM at 7:45 if you need a ride.


EUCHARISTIC CONGRESS
The 10th annual Eucharistic Congress of the Diocese of Charlotte is Sept. 19-20.  One of our students described this event as a "Catholic family reunion for the Diocese."  We'll be taking a group from WCU to participate in an all-night lock-in at St. Peter's in downtown Charlotte, with overnight Adoration, participate in the Eucharistic Procession on Saturday morning, and enjoy all the guest speakers, music, vendors and more.  It's $15, and that gets you a t-shirt and lunch on Saturday.  If you have not signed up yet, please do so TODAY at:
http://www.catholiconcampus.com/eucharistic-congress


SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES
Flip this Prison.  Haywood Pathways Center in Waynesville is the winner of the Guaranteed Rate Giveback Challenge, which means that Ty Pennington and his crew are coming to help them tear down and rebuild the old Department of Corrections building in Waynesville on Sept. 25.  Our campus' Center for Service Learning will be running shuttles from WCU to the work site for any who want to help.  To sign up as a volunteer, go to the Haywood Pathways web site:
http://haywoodpathwayscenter.org/volunteer/

You can learn more about the project by watching this short video:
http://youtu.be/XZaXUfBw78k

Community Table. Catholic Campus Ministry is working with Community Table, our local food charity, to establish a regular volunteer work day on which we would provide 6 to 8 students to help serve meals and staff the kitchen.  The time would be from 3:30 to 6:30 on either Mondays, Tuesdays or Thursdays.  If this is a project you are interested in being involved with, please let us know which day would work best for you.  We will be setting up a poll on our Facebook Group.  If you are not on Facebook, please email me your preference.  We hope this will be a regular, ongoing service we can provide to our community. To learn more about Community Table please visit their web site:


FAITH FACTS
When you hear the word "chastity," is your initial reaction positive or negative?  Do you view it as a virtue to pursue or does the word to you suggest repression and resentment?  Many in our culture today actually resent the idea of chastity because of the negative way it is presented in our society, including in the media as well as in many college classrooms.  Dr. Edward Sri talks about the resentment of chastity and explains the Church's very positive message about chastity in this article:
"Resenting Chastity" by Dr. Edward Sri


Until next week!
God Bless,
Matt

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WCU Catholic Campus Ministry
Matthew Newsome, MTh, campus minister
  
(828)293-9374  |   POB 2766, Cullowhee NC 28723